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A’Sailin’ We Will Go…

Some weeks back, some of you (OK, one of you) said that you’d like to see some pictures of our sailboat and maybe some pictures of us sailing. Well, that subject’s got little to do with Sheltie rescue (except that it costs approximately the same amount of money), but here goes.

Our sailboat is named Dream SeQueL. The reason for the funny spelling is that I’ve been the editor for the International Standard for Database Language SQL (sometimes incorrectly pronounced “sequel”) for almost a quarter of a century, and it is that career that has enabled me to travel all over the world on business (often with Barbara) and made it possible for us to afford to buy this boat. She’s a 40′ Passport built in 1982 and was designed for ocean crossings (“passage-making”). Some day, I hope that Barbara and I can sail her all over the world, including perhaps a circumnavigation.

Here she is at the dock in Clearwater Beach, FL, where she lives:

[photopress:Dream_SeQueL_2007_05_and_06.JPG,full,centered]

This is another shot of (part of) her, out of the water:

[photopress:Dream_SeQueL_out_of_water.JPG,full,centered]

This is an interior shot taken from the “saloon” (a/k/a living room) looking foward through our cabin (a/k/a bedroom) into the head (a/k/a bathroom); note the berth (a/k/a bed) on the left through the first bulkhead (a/k/a wall):

[photopress:Dream_SeQueL_looking_forward_from_saloon.JPG,full,centered]

Here’s another interior shot (apologies for the soft focus…er, out of focus), this one of the galley (a/k/a kitchen):

[photopress:Dream_SeQueL_galley.JPG,full,centered]

Barbara’s sitting in the saloon on the settee (a/k/a couch) ready to eat dinner.

[photopress:Barbara_at_Dream_SeQueL_table.JPG,full,centered]

Interesting factoid: our diesel engine (4-cylinder, 55 HP) is actually under the table (enclosed in a wooden structure). We’re told that the engine can be removed from the boat (through a hatch, a/k/a skylight, just above the table) in under two hours.

In mid-2007, we sailed Dream SeQueL down the Gulf coast of Florida to the picturesque town of Venice. We’d planned to sail her further down, but the weather radio informed us that Tropical Storm Barry was barrelling north, so we decided we should head back toward our home dock. We can travel at approximately 7.5 knots (a/k/a nautical miles per hour) maximum under most conditions. Tropical Storm Barry was travelling at about 20 knots. Needless to say, it caught up with us, building the waves up to seven or eight feet and the wind up to about 25 knots. This boat can take it — she was as stable and controlled as if she were on flat seas. And I had a blast:

[photopress:Jim_in_Tropical_Storm_Barry_at_the_wheel_of_Dream_SeQueL_2007_05_and_06_.JPG,full,centered]

Here’s what it looks like from behind the wheel looking forward past our chart plotter instrument:

[photopress:E80_NavPod_and_angle_guard_mounted_on_Dream_SeQueL_.JPG,full,centered]

And, finally, before I cease boring you all with our boat, here’s a picture of my very first line splice! It’s a self-splice to capture a thimble used to protect the line from being abraded by the metal shackle used to attach an anchor to the line.

[photopress:Jim__s_Very_First_Line_Splice.JPG,full,centered]

On this day..

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7 comments to A’Sailin’ We Will Go…

  • Very nice, but I know that you guys TRULY don’t have any fun while you are out there…Missing all the dogs like you do and all lol.

  • Let me tell you a secret: I live on an island in the South Pacific and I HATE boats, beaches and water :)

  • That is so totally cool! Was probably me that wanted to see pictures. Gorgeous Boat! Marie and I have decided that we want to come for a sail sometime with you guys. ;)

    So ‘sequel’ is an incorrect pronunciation huh? I have never said ‘sequel’, I’ve said SQL all the time, I like it better. Can I now go around and tell people that ‘sequel’ is incorrect and they have to say SQL? LOL

    My little 22′ sailboat had a hull speed of about 6 knots, and in the San Francisco bay (I should get some pics of that up huh?) the tide was almost faster than our speed, so we almost got pulled out in the ocean. We were nervous!

    Very cool that your boat is so stable in high waves. That scares me… now that I’m older and much more mortal than I used to be, I’m much more worried about sailing too!

  • Living in NZ and hating boats, beaches, and water? Isn’t that against the law down there? (By the way, NZ is one of my very favorite countries; I’m especially fond of the South Island!)

  • Josh and Jess, ummm, that previous comment was meant for you! I failed to click the little envelop icon, though.

  • Cyn, you and Marie are totally welcome to come sailing with us! Heck, you can even bring Layla (although I’m not quite so sure about a collie coming along :) ).

    I’d love to see pics of your boat. The only(!) sailboat I’d even been aboard when Barbara and I bought our boat was in San Francisco Bay. A good friend of mine, Jim Gray (see next paragraph) invited me to go out with him on his (35′?) boat, and he let me drive for a while. No, I wasn’t instantly hooked, but at least I’d been out on a sailboat once.

    Jim was in the news a year or so ago when he went missing on a fair day sail out to the Farallon Islands about 30 miles outside of the Golden Gate. Jim was a pretty important person in the computer industry (on the National Science Foundation and an advisor to NASA, amongst other things). NASA re-routed a satellite to search for him full-time for a couple of months, the government re-commissioned a U2 spy plane to help look for him, and the Coast Guard put several boats out almost full time searching for weeks. Nothing was ever found, not even debris.

    And even Jim called the language “sequel”, no matter how many times I’d correct him ;) So tell everybody you know what the correct pronounciation is, and tell ‘em that I back you up!

  • oh that is crazy about your friend.

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