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Some days…

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Sailing to the Bahamas and Back or Where on Earth Were Barbara & Jim for the Last Month?

The link below is the first of 16 posts at http://DreamSequel.com with photos and details of where we’ve been and how many things Jim learned to repair on our way to the Bahamas and on our way home from the Bahamas – crossing the gulf stream in both directions – being in blue water for literally days at a time, and rounding all the Florida keys – twice.  I have a new found awe in Jim’s abilities to deal with almost anything boat-related.

http://dreamsequel.com/2012/03/to-the-bahamas-part-1-start-of-a-real-cruise/

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Dog and Cat Treats from China May be Poisoning Your Pets Even if They’re Branded Under a VERY Reputable Brand Name

ALERT: Vets warn of new treats from China poisoning dogs

When I has a tired I always feel bettr after snugglin under cubbers

Despite repeated warnings issued by the FDA, veterinarians are reporting new cases of dogs developing symptoms of kidney failure (Fanconi’s syndrome) similar to dogs who have been poisoned by Chinese-made chicken jerky treats, but this time they are being poisoned with a whole new class of treats: sweet potato treats imported from China.

The brands veterinarians say are associated with the new cases of unexplained acute kidney failure are Canyon Creek Ranch Chicken Yam Good Dog Treats (Nestle-Purina), Beefeaters Sweet Potato Treats (16 types of yam-related treats), Drs. Foster and Smith (exact item not specified in the report) and Dogswell Veggie Life Vitality (4 types of Veggie Life brands).

It is important to remember that although the type of treat most often mentioned in the press is described as a jerky treat, the treats may also be called by a myriad of other names such as stix, chips, poppers, tenders, drumettes, kabob’s, strips, fries, lollipops, twists, wraps, bars, tops and discs (I wish I was making this up).

The report goes on to say that there is speculation the problems may also extend to pork treats and cat treats imported from China.

In 2010 the FDA issued an Import Refusal Report and later issued an Import Alert for sweet potato dog treats imported from a company in China (whose main business is, oddly, in rubber and plastic raw materials) were contaminated with a highly toxic pesticide known as Phorate.

Phorate is an extremely toxic organophosphorus compound and is among the most poisonous chemicals commonly used for pest control. It is used in agriculture as a pesticide and Phorate is identified byPesticide Action Network (PAN) and Californians for Pesticide Reform (CPR) as one of the “most toxic” set of pesticides known (aka a Bad Actor) in the world.

Although Phorate is known primarily as a neurotoxin and not classified as a nephrotoxin and therefore unlikely to cause acute renal failure in dogs, its presence in any food item is a disturbing indication that treats of any kind imported from China could pose a risk to the health and safety of pets and to the consumers handling them.

Holistic veterinarian Dr. Jean Hofve report on the sweet potato treats from China follows:

Sweet Potato Treats from China Causing Kidney Failure?

April 5, 2012
By (Dr. Jean Hofve of Little Big Cat)

On the Veterinary Information Network, several veterinarians have reported cases where dogs have developed symptoms of kidney failure (Fanconi’s syndrome) similar to dogs who have been poisoned by Chinese-made chicken jerky treats.

So far, the brands implicated are all made in China:

  • Beefeaters Sweet Potato Snacks for Dogs
  • Canyon Creek Ranch Chicken Yam Good Dog Treats (FDA has issued a warning on this product)
  • Drs. Foster and Smith (exact item not specified in the report)
  • Dogswell Veggie Life Vitality

There was also speculation that the problem may also extend to pork products (pig ears) and cat treats made in China. Australian veterinarians have reported similar symptoms from chicken jerky treats, as well as several cases associated with “Veggie Dents,” a dog treat made in Vietnam by Virbac, an American company. Virbac recalled one batch of Veggie Dents in Australia in 2009.

The FDA still claims that there is no pending recall of Chinese-made pet treats, even though it has repeatedly issued warnings about the problems associated with chicken jerky treats since 2007.

Symptoms of Fanconi’s syndrome include:

  • Increased drinking and urinating
  • “Accidents” in the house
  • Reduced appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Weakness
  • Blood and urine tests show azotemia (high BUN and Creatinine), dilute urine, and glucose in the urine (that isn’t diabetes).

Most affected dogs have recovered over time with good supportive care.

We strongly recommend that you check the source of all cat or dog treats you may have purchased, and do not give them to your pet if they were made in China. It would be best to avoid any pet food or treat products made in China, and probably a good idea to avoid all dried animal parts, because they are not heated to a temperature that will kill pathogenic bacteria.


References

Phorate EXTOXNET (Cornell)

Related articles

FDA inspectors are investigating jerky treat production facilities in China (poisonedpets.com)
Secret FDA document reveals test results of chicken jerky treats (poisonedpets.com)
U.S. Senator Brown Presses the FDA Over Inadequate Response to Tainted Chicken Jerky Inquiry (poisonedpets.com)
More dogs die as poisonous jerky treats remain on store shelves (poisonedpets.com)
Congressional Leaders Demand FDA Action to Protect Dogs from Poisonous Jerky Treats (poisonedpets.com)
Chicken Jerky Pet Treat Alert (poisonedpets.com)
Update: Thaxton family nightmare after dogs poisoned by jerky treats continues (poisonedpets.com)
A grieving family wants chicken jerky dog treats to be taken off the market.

More information available at http://PoisonedPets.com

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Recall of Canine Kibble Includes; Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul, Country Value, Diamond, Diamond Naturals, Premium Edge, Professional, 4Health,Taste of the Wild

May 4, 2012

Diamond Expands Voluntary Recall

UPDATED: CORRECT PRODUCTION CODE INFORMATION

Diamond Pet Foods Expands Voluntary Recall of Dry Pet Food Due to Potential Salmonella Contamination

Batches of the brands manufactured between
December 9, 2011 and April 7, 2012 are affected

Consumer Contact: 866-918-8756
Media Contact: 816-255-1974

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 5, 2012

Diamond Pet Foods today announced that it is expanding a voluntary recall to include batches of nine brands of dry pet food formulas manufactured between December 9, 2011 and April 7, 2012 due to potential Salmonella contamination.

In April 2012, Diamond Pet Foods initiated three voluntary recalls of Diamond manufactured dry dog food. Although none of the additional products being recalled have tested positive for Salmonella, the company is pulling them from store shelves as a precaution. Diamond Pet Foods is coordinating efforts with federal and state health and regulatory agencies and decided to independently expand the recall to ensure the safety and well-being of customers and their pets.

The company stated: “We have taken corrective actions at our Gaston, S.C., facility and voluntarily expanded the recall out of concern for our customers and their pets.”

Brands included in the recall include:

  • Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul
  • Country Value
  • Diamond
  • Diamond Naturals
  • Premium Edge
  • Professional
  • 4Health
  • Taste of the Wild

To determine if their pet food is recalled, consumers should check the production code on their bag. If the code has a “2” or “3” in the 9th position AND an “X” in the 10th or 11th position, the product is affected by the recall. The best-before dates for the recalled products are December 9, 2012 through April 7, 2013.The following graphic illustrates how to read the production code and best-before date:

The recall affects only products distributed in the following U.S. states and Canada.  Further distribution through other pet food channels may have occurred.

  • Alabama
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Indiana
  • Kentucky
  • Massachusetts
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • Mississippi
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Virginia
  • Canada

The Kirkland Signature products included in the recall include:

  • Kirkland Signature Super Premium Adult Dog Lamb, Rice & Vegetable Formula (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
  • Kirkland Signature Super Premium Adult Dog Chicken, Rice & Vegetable Formula (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
  • Kirkland Signature Super Premium Mature Dog Chicken, Rice & Egg Formula (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
  • Kirkland Signature Super Premium Healthy Weight Dog Formulated with Chicken & Vegetables (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
  • Kirkland Signature Super Premium Maintenance Cat Chicken & Rice Formula (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
  • Kirkland Signature Super Premium Healthy Weight Cat Formula (December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
  • Kirkland Signature Nature’s Domain Salmon Meal & Sweet Potato Formula for Dogs (December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)

To determine if their pet food is recalled, consumers should check the production code on their bag. If the code has both a “3” in the 9th position AND an “X” in the 11th position, the product is affected by the recall. The best-before dates for the recalled products are December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013.The following graphic illustrates how to read the production code and best-before date:

The recall affects only products distributed in the following U.S. states, Puerto Rico and Canada.

  • Alabama
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Canada
  • Puerto Rico

Diamond Pet Foods apologizes for any issues this may cause consumers and their pets. Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like replacement product or a refund, may contact Diamond Pet Foods via a toll free call at 1-866-918-8756, Monday through Sunday, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. EST.  Consumers may also go to a special website, www.diamondpetrecall.com, for more information. The company is working with distributors and retailers to ensure all affected product is removed from shelves.

Pets with Salmonella infections may have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Individuals handling dry pet food can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with surfaces exposed to this product. People who believe they may have been exposed to Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. According to the Centers for Disease Control, people who are more likely to be affected by Salmonella include infants, children younger than 5 years old, organ transplant patients, people with HIV/AIDS and people receiving treatment for cancer. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have received a limited number of reports of salmonellosis, the illness caused by Salmonella. We are working with the CDC, but due to patient confidentiality, we cannot comment further.

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You May Be Moved by Their Ads on TV But Here’s Just One of Many Reasons Why You Should NEVER Donate or Support HSUS (Humane Society of the US)

As a nonprofit organization Sheltie Rescue of Utah cannot invest a significant portion of our funds to influence political decisions.  In fact, we invest ALL our funds into providing care for our rescues.

HSUS is also a nonprofit bound by these same restrictions however, not only do they have many very highly payed lobbyists in Washington, DC they have actually side-stepped the rules that must be followed by organizations that want to send lobbyists to Washington.  When you see the animals in the HSUS commercials that need help – remember – they use those dollars, your dollars, to wield political power and NOT to help those animals they are featuring in their commercials.  You can learn more about this issue in the text below and visit this link to learn about The Cavalry Group http://www.thecavalrygroup.com/

HSUS SENIOR LEADERSHIP “BLINKED!” – - CALL TO ACTION – - NEED 1,000S OF E-MAILS!!!

ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE LOBBYING DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1995 BY THE HSUS AND HSLF by Frank Losey
In 2005 the HSUS was registered as a “Lobbying Organization” and it listed Wayne Pacelle as one of its “Lobbyists.” However, the HSUS apparently terminated its Registration at a later date.  In contrast, the Humane Society Legislative Fund (HSLF) which oversees three PACs, and which was founded by Mr. Pacelle in 2004, had never registered itself as a “Lobbying Organization” – - UNTIL FEBRAURY 29, 2012! That is when the HSLF and the Senior Leadership of the HSUS “BLINKED,” and they registered the HSLF as a “Lobbying Organization” – - a DELIQUENCY OF OVER 7 YEARS!!!  Most significantly, when the HSLF filed its Registration with the Secretary of the Senate, it listed Mrs. Constance Harriman-Whitfield as one of its “Lobbyists.” This further “taints” the HSUS for its failure to no longer be registered as a “Lobbying Organization” because Mrs. Harriman-Whitfield, according to her BIO that was posted on the HSUS Website, is a Paid Employee of the HSUS, and she serves as the “Senior Advisor” for “HSUS President and CEO Wayne Pacelle.” Thus, the recent HSLF Registration substantiates that the HSUS, which is no longer registered, is in violation of the Lobbying Disclosure Act.  In this regard, Mr. Pacelle was previously listed, BY NAME, as a Lobbyist for the HSUS in 2005, and now his Senior Advisor, who is on the payroll of the HSUS, has been identified as a “Lobbyist.”  If the HSUS were Pinocchio, its nose would be growing longer and longer with respect to how it has circumvented the Lobbying Disclosure Act OF 1995. Yet another significant event occurred on March 13, 2012.  On that date, a Mr. H. Marshall Jarrett, the Director of the Executive Office for United States Attorneys, Department of Justice, responded to the inquiry of Virginia Senator Warner, and confirmed that “a referral was received with respect to the HSUS and is subject to the same review as all referrals, as set out above.” This is a significant acknowledgement, and opens a huge door for everyone to send a follow-up E-Mail to their two Senators and U.S. Representative, even if you have previously sent E-Mails in the past.  Do not add anything more than what is suggested.  In short, don’t mention PUPS or any other Bill. Just limit your remarks to the Lobbying Disclosure Act. THE OPPORTUNITY TO “COUNTER-ATTACK” BILLS, LIKE PUPS, WILL BE EXPONETIALLY ENHANCED IF THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT AGRESIVELY INVESTIGATES THE HSUS FOR THE ALLEGED AND DOCUMENTED VIOLATION THE LOBBYNIG DISCLOSURE ACT.   If the HSUS “BLINKS,” as did the HSLF, and then re-registers, it is admitting to the IRS that it has been playing “fast and loose” – - AND THAT COULD RESULT IN THE HSUS LOSING ITS TAX-EXEMPT STATUS. And if it does not register, there will be mounting Congressional pressure to ask the Justice Department to investigate the HSUS.  Already, at least Seven Members of Congress have asked the Justice Department to look into the documented allegations that it had previously received.  And yet another submission, WITH “NEW EVIDENCE,” was received by the Justice Department on March 7, 2012.  Let us build upon the potential “momentum changer” that was created when the HSLF “BLINKED” and registered as a “Lobbying Organization.” 1. To send an E-Mail to your U.S. Representative, Log onto www.house.gov/writerep/ 2. Fill in your state and ZIP Code on the prompt that appears. 3. Add your name, address and E-Mail address on E-Mail Form for your U.S. Representative; and on the Subject Line add: LOBBYING DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1995.  If that Subject Line will not allow you to use that Subject, use “OTHER.”  Then add then add the message set out below. 4. To send an E-Mail to your Two Senators, Log onto: www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm 5. Click onto the E-Mail Address for each of your two U.S. Senators. 6. Add your name, address and E-Mail address on E-Mail Form for your U.S. Representative; and on the Subject Line add:  LOBBYING DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1995. If that Subject Line will not allow you to use that Subject, use “OTHER.”  Then add then add the message set out below. 7. Send a confirmation that the three E-Mails were sent from which State, and any Congressional Responses, to Frank Losey: <f.losey@insightbb.com>
Suggested Text of E-Mail Message
Resist the temptation to mention your parochial “beef” with the HSUS.  Otherwise, you may receive a “boilerplate” response that says nothing more than:  “Thank You for bringing your issues of concern to my attention.” WE NEED MORE MEMBERS OF CONGRESS TO CONTACT THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT!  WE NEED THOUSANDS OF E-MAILS BEING SENT TO MEMBERS OF CONGRESS TO OFFSET THE MILLIONS OF E-MAILS THAT THE HSUS GENERATES EACH YEAR THROUGH THE “FUNCTIONALITY OF ITS WEBSITE!” NUMBERS DO MAKE A DIFFERENCE! ********************************************** Dear Senator/ Representative: I have now learned that at least Seven Members of Congress have contacted the Justice Department on behalf of their constituents, and asked for feedback on the status of the formal Complaint that it had received, which Complaint documented that the Humane Society of the U.S. and its self-described “Lobbying Arm,” the Humane Society Legislative Fund, were not in compliance with the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995.  That is why I would appreciate if you would contact, on my behalf, Mr. H. Marshall Jarrett (202-252-1000), the Director of the Executive Office for United States Attorneys, Department of Justice, and ask him the following: “By letter dated March 13, 2012, you confirmed to Senator Warner that a “referral” concerning a formal, documented complaint about the alleged violation of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 by the Humane Society of the U.S. (HSUS) “was received with respect to the HSUS and is subject to the same review as all referrals.” Since the referenced referral pertained to a Complaint that had been submitted to Mr. Keith Morgan, and was received by him on August 5, 2011 – - more than 8 months ago – - what is a reasonable timeline for reviewing the “referral” and initiating appropriate compliance action if allegations in the 8+ month old Complaint are validated?”
Additionally, would you please advise me when the Clerk of the House and the Secretary of the Senate will publish procedures that will allow a private citizen to file a complaint concerning allegations that an organization is not in compliance with the Lobbing Disclosure Act of 1995?  In this regard, shouldn’t it be reasonable to expect that the Clerk of the House and the Secretary of the Senate would have implemented, by now, a formal procedure for the filing of a citizen complaint for this 17year-old statute?
I look forward to your response in the hope that your inquiries on my behalf will ensure that the spirit, letter and intent of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 are executed with flawless precision, and will further ensure that the intended purpose of “Open, Transparent and Honest Government” is also executed with flawless precision.                                                                                                             Respectfully, Posted by at 8:26 PM Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook Labels: 

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A Dog’s Last Will and Testament – Beautiful

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Kidney Disease, Rimadyl and Anti-Inflammatory Meds, Arthritis, and Alternative Treatments

The previous post by one of Sheltie Rescue of Utah’s favorite adopters, Sharon St. John, raises so many important topics that I wanted to make a post out of my detailed reply to her post. – Barbara Edelberg

  • There is SO much kidney disease rampant in dogs and cats that you really can’t attribute the occurrence of it to a single medication – even long term – as rimadyl usually is administered.  Generally, the first organ that rimadyl impacts is the liver.  Because this is a known issue, vets that prescribe rimadyl or any anti-inflammatory often require periodic blood work to see if the anti-inflammatory is impacting the liver in particular, negatively.  The liver enzyme values in a comprehensive blood panel are the critical ones to watch.
  • When a veterinarian runs a blood panel on a dog, he generally checks for five enzymes. These five enzymes are very important in diagnosing, liver disease in dogs, if any. These enzymes include alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALKP), serum bilirubin and gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT). The normal liver enzyme in dogs according to Merck Veterinary Manual is as follows:

    Alanine Aminotransferase: 8.2 to 57 u/L
    Alkaline Phosphatase: 10.6 to 101 u/L
    Aspartate Aminotransferase: 8.2 to 57 u/L
    Gamma Glutamyltransferase: 1.0 to 9.7 u/L
    Serum Bilirubin: 0.1 to 0.6 mg/dL

    Even if your vet is not inclined to require a regular blood panel or liver panel for dogs that are on an anti-inflammatory (many do not have a system in place to flag these dogs) the most valuable regular veterinary procedure any dog or cat owner can have done on a regular basis, either yearly or every six months depending upon the age and condition of the pet, is a comprehensive blood panel covering all organs and which includes a urinalysis and thyroid test.  In my experience this is far more important than going for annual vaccinations.  Most pets do not need that vaccination at all because they already have more than adequate levels of antigens in their blood from the vaccinations they received in their first through 2nd years of life.
    But to address your question of how to help dogs with arthritis without compromising their health through the use of anti-inflammatories…
    (I should mention that I regularly use rimadyl and think it has extremely beneficial results – but blood work must be monitored.)
    There are supplements that are regularly recommended for dogs to support improvement in arthritic joints as well as pain relief.  Here are my favorites.  Each of these has specific directions on the labels for how much to administer based on the weight of your dog.  A canine orthopedist can tell you that dogs are much more responsive to the use of these supplements (glucosamine, chondroitin, and others) than humans are.  Unlike humans, canines can regenerate cartilage.  These supplements are aimed at achieving two goals – improvement of the physical joint and reduction of inflammation and pain.  So here are my favorite supplements for arthritic seniors at Sheltie Rescue of Utah:

    Vetri-Science Glyco-Flex III – this is for advanced and pretty bad arthritis.  I like the pricing I get on this from http://KVVet.com. ( I also buy items numbered 2 and 3 below from KVVet.com.) There are formulas labeled Glyco-Flex II and probably a I.  I don’t know how to decide when it’s time to graduate from one to the next.
    Cosequin DS (which stands for “double strength”) I like to use this with dogs with mild arthritic issues or possibly even moderate arthritic issues.  This is what I use for dogs who are not yet at the Glyco-Flex III level of need.
    Welactin – this is a fish oil supplement high in omega-3 fatty acids.  This has a known anti-inflammatory effect and thus contributes to a reduction in pain.  It has other benefits as well including being very good for the skin and coat which often suffer from lack of adequate nutritional support as dogs (or humans) age.
    Pain Away – Joint & Back Pain Relief – this is a 100% human grade product.  A 4oz container goes a LONG way and cost me $12.99.  The container states “This product is designed to reduce joint & back pain and to rebuild damaged tissue associated with arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.”  This product is distributed by Healthline Nutrition in Vancouver, WA.  Their website is http://cssilverhl.com
    In support of these supplements I think it’s extremely important to feed your pets the highest quality food you can.  While many diseases arise from genetic predispositions – the disposition doesn’t have to be realized.  Just as in human health, providing the body with the tools to combat disease is an important component of better health.  In the last 10 years we have seen a jump in the longevity of dogs that come to us which I believe is associated with both improvements in dog food overall as well as improvements in veterinary care.
    I am an avid dispenser of vitamins both for me and our dogs.  My favorite vitamin for adult dogs is Vetri-Science Canine Plus for adult dogs.  For seniors, I like Vetri-Science Canine Plus for Seniors.  For seniors with few or no teeth or painful mouth conditions I use (often in conjunction with a crushed Canine Plus for Seniors tablet) a powdered vitamin formula called Young At Heart which I buy at http://JeffersPet.com.&nbsp; The same company that makes Young At Heart also makes a powdered supplement called Show Stopper which many people who show their dogs in the show ring, swear by.

    Sharon – I hope this is somewhat helpful to you.  The pain of loss from whatever cause is an agony that is hardly bearable.  Thinking that a treatment that was administered contributed to that loss would leave me wracked with even more pain and tremendous guilt.  Kidney disease is a creeping disease that, as you found with Mattie, can be detected early.  Signs of kidney disease may not show up on some tests until a significant portion of the kidney is unable to function normally.  Rimadyl may have had a contributory role but its impact is NOT primarily on the kidneys and I doubt that it was the primary culprit in Chloe’s situation.  Rimadyl may actually have provided her with pain relief from some of the effects of kidney disease as well as pain relief from her arthritis. Even with advanced insight, as with Mattie, you generally cannot do anything more than slow down the progression of this disease.  ( I have friends who had dogs that were diagnosed with kidney disease and with special supplements which I need to dig up or re-discover – actually seemed to have eliminated it.  But these are rare exceptions.)
    I would also note that while a low protein diet is the mantra for pets with kidney disease, there is still controversy over that with some people feeling that providing adequate protein levels is more important than the stress that the processing of the protein, puts on the kidneys.
    ps I do not get any compensation from the companies or webstores mentioned.  If I did, I wouldn’t be going nuts finding ways to raise funds to pay the vet bills incurred by our rescued Shelties.  I’m definitely all for universal health care for both people and pets.


    I forgot to mention that besides using supplements there are some other avenues of treatment for arthritis available now through veterinary clinics…there are now k-laser treatments and Adequan injections (directly into the joint) that are much safer and can also be far more effective than an anti-inflammatory alone.  Many times dogs getting these treatments no longer take an anti-inflammatory or they can be on a significantly reduced dose.  Ask your vet about k-laser treatments and Adequan injections.


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Anti Inflammatory Drugs are killing my Shelties

In December, we lost 10 year old Chloe to acute renal failure. The vet said it was caused mainly by long term use of Rimydal. We took our Mattie in for teeth cleaning last week, had blood work done and she showed stage 1 signs of Kidney Disease. Vet said take her off anti inflammatory drugs NOW. She has to be on a low protein, low phosphorus diet  which will extend her life somewhat. As you can imagine, we are heart sick for our girl. It’s a catch 22. Suffer from arthritis or die early. Surely there has to be something in between!! Any ideas??

Thanks, Sharon St.John

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Lost Sheltie

Or dog Little Lad ran away from us on the 13th of this month. We miss him very much and have put up filers around the neighborhood and posted adds everywhere for him. If you have seen him, please let us know! He is tri-color, though mostly tan and white. There is a REWARD involved!

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New Kids Tracy, Bridger, Lucy, Lexi, Camera-Shy Molly (Unseen) and More!

We are so overloaded!  We have several youngsters who are just under or just over a year of age.  We have three kids who need their potty training shaped up.  But they are each such wonderful kids…  – Barbara

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